Land Boundary Agreement The Hindu

Five years ago, on July 31, 2015, the historic Land Border Agreement (AMLA) between India and Bangladesh paved the way for resolving the seven-decade-long issue of enclaves between the two countries. About 14,854 people living in 51 enclaves of Bangladesh deep into India have become Indian citizens and another 922 people arrived in Coochbehar district five years ago from Indian enclaves in Bangladesh. [22] “Issue No. 1748 Land Boundary Agreement with Bangladesh.” Public Diplomacy Division, Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India, New Delhi, 4 May 2016. www.mea.gov.in/lok-sabha.htm?dtl/26749/QUESTION+NO1748+LAND+BOUNDARY+AGREEMENT+WITH+BANGLADESH. The visions of the Land government remain at odds with the campers` aspirations. Thus, the government had promised to make sustainable settlements available to campers after two years. While the state government plans, according to government officials, to build housing consisting of a ground floor and a first floor – according to the government scheme of Nijo Griho, Nijo Bhumi Patta for campers – the latter want houses that they would put on the ground in the countryside. [41] Under the influence of local politicians from rival parties, campers are now convinced that the government`s idea of providing them with housing will hardly meet their demands and expectations. A recent press report indicates that they have written to Prime Minister Modi and that most of them are actively handing over memoranda to local officials in Cooch Behar district to express their dissatisfaction with the advance. [42] There are also protests.

[43] The land border agreement was concluded on May 14, 1974, Indira Gandhi and Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, who announced the exchange of enclaves and the surrender of harmful goods. [17] Under the agreement, India retained the Berubari Union No. 12 enclave, while Bangladesh retained the Dahagram-Angorpota enclaves, with India having access to them by providing a 178-metre by 85-metre corridor (584 feet × 279 feet) called the Tin Bigha Corridor. Bangladesh quickly ratified the agreement in 1974, but India did not. The issue of the undemarcated land boundary of about 6.1 kilometers (3.8 miles) in three sectors – Daikhata-56 in West Bengal, Muhuri River-Belonia in Tripura and Lathitila-Dumabari in Assam – has also not been resolved. . . .